Getting Better as We Fix What we Broke

Without question, especially speaking morally, we must fix what we broke. Relatively speaking, despite being the most educated and advanced civilization to date, we are causing damage to our environment, we are sicker and less happy and more in debt than we should be. We are more materially abundant than ever. Despite striving for and getting much more, we only learned that we cannot buy happiness or health, it must be earned.

Fixing what is broken also relates to prevention. Even if we prevent all problems, we have not intentionally done anything to promote a better outcome. To promote better we must enable more capacity and increased potential. If the focus changed from fixing what we broke to building more capacity, potential and partnerships, so a better future could be realized, we would get better while also fixing what we broke.

This is the only way to be better than we were before. This better leads to an increased ability to overcome inevitable difficulties that also provides a better potential to prevent or avoid inevitable difficulties. Our increased ability to overcome would result from having developed more abilities from the beneficial interactions generated from the redesign of reality.

Relatedly, the health promotion or health care movement became the disease treatment and prevention movement, instead of the health generation, creation and improvement movement. On this trek the field has sought to continually find the root cause of the problem instead of designing a reality for success. I describe this in the evolution of positive health video:

Of course it is good to eliminate external or “special causes”, however we also need to develop better methods to move beyond not bad, or zero, the status quo. If we already had the needed method, our goals would have already been achieved. Using methods to generate more skills and ability through pervasive, reciprocal, selfish, selfless, synergistic interactions benefits everyone and everything, due to comprehensive systemic improvements. To achieve this +3 outcome, we must exceed expectations.

Doing Better than Fixing what we Broke: In “The Improvement Guide: A Practical Approach to Enhancing Organizational Performance” by Gerald J. Langley , Ronald D. Moen, Kevin M. Nolan, Thomas W. Nolan, Clifford L. Norman, Lloyd P. Provost they emphasized maintenance teams should be updated to become improvement teams (For more see Evolve Maintenance to Improvement to Create +3’s). Maintaining keeps things as they and this is insufficient when improvement is desired.


For example, often people interchangeably use sustainability and regeneration. They are different. Both are good, however regeneration ALWAYS supports sustainability but not all sustainable actions are regenerative. Regeneration also includes restoration, rejuvenation, renewal, replenishing, healing, nurturing, revitalizing, reenergizing, harmonizing and more. Regeneration is restoring and renewing systems as it improves the ability of those systems to restore, renew and heal more effectively if damaged. That means it is an improved or better version. (see figure below) 

Regeneration Means more than Sustainability

 

All of this relates to the Concept: Create More Good, Not Just Less Bad as posted on . More good means something akin to what McDonough and Braungart describe in their book Upcycle. As the chart below, displays more good, not just less bad optimizes the positive impact that is possible with Upcycle efforts. 

 

What does this mean?
I had started this post prior to attending a retreat we had at work related to race relations. Without question, better relations and improved interactions are a valuable and important goal and this means better methods are needed. I am also reading Marshall Rosenberg’s, NonViolent Communication. While the title seems to suggest it would be a focus on less bad, the contents demonstrate how to generate more good.
In the book he describes a 4 step process for more effective communication.

Four Components of NVC

  1. Observations – objectively observed concrete well-being impacting actions 
  2. Feelings – how do we feel in relation to what we observe
  3. Needs – identify the unmet needs, values, or desires that create those feelings
  4. Request – concrete actions we request in order to enrich our lives
At the retreat I attended, the initial keynote outlined all the unarguable facts of disadvantages that have resulted from our current methods. Using the method above I observed what happened. When I checked in with my feelings, I realized I agreed with everything said – there are were problems and bad actions had been taken. However the presentation left me feeling defensive. As Marshall Rosenberg explains, defensiveness makes compassionate actions difficult.
 
I needed a better way. A better method would have been a plan for everyone and everything to benefit, which by default must help those more disadvantaged most. If it did not do that, it would not be an optimized process. My request, lets work together to find a way to generate comprehensive improvements by creating pervasive reciprocal, selfish, selfless, synergistic interactions so everyone and everything benefits.
 
Last year I posted: MLK Day FOR Everyone’s Benefit, where I acknowledged how W. Edwards Deming insisted:
Defend your rights, you lose. – W. Edwards Deming
Although it may seem contradictory, Deming said this because he knew that we needed to make it better not just for one group, we needed to make a better system so everyone and everything benefits.
 
Please share how you will help build a better system and generate comprehensive improvements by letting us know how you create pervasive, reciprocal, selfish, selfless, synergistic interactions so everyone and everything benefits.

Be Well’r,
Craig Becker

Be selfish, selfless, & synergistic so everyone and everything benefits!

#SelfishSelflessSynergy

Please contact me:
Email: BeWellr@gmail.com

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